Fresh Pepper Kimchi

Fresh Pepper Kimchi

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

With the recent popularity of kimchi, and fermenting in general, there have to be hundreds of recipes available online and in print. So why the hell do we need another one, you may ask? Because you need ONE TO CALL YOUR OWN! Fermented food is a natural expression of local bacteria. The subtle differences in the byproducts of these bacteria make every version unique to where it was fermented. Likewise, the ingredients in your fermentation hold the essence of your locality just as much as the bacteria.

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Green Cherry Tomato Chutney

Cherry Tomatoes

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Have you ever done something, knowing it wasn’t a good idea from the get-go, but you do it anyways? That basically describes my daily decision making process. Luckily, most of these ideas are pretty innocent. Case in point – I am relatively new to gardening but still should have know better than to put tomato plants in my 4′ x 12′ raised bed. I mean, how big can a tomato plant really get? Well, it turns out, freaking huge. Like, the wing span of an eagle huge (ok, I have no idea how big an eagle’s wing span is, but the plants reached at least 3 feet long in two directions, so it was probably close). In the end, the two cherry tomato plants, along with 4 tomatillo plants (which also should not have planted in a raised bed, duh) took over about two-thirds of the garden. You can hardly tell what is going on in the picture below but as you can see, the plants spilled out in all directions.

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Golden Milk Waffles

Golden Milk Waffles

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Golden milk – a turmeric based tea commonly flavored with ginger and cinnamon – has been all the rage over the past couple of years. It is creamy (usually thanks to almond and/or coconut milk) and lightly sweetened, both of which balance turmeric’s pungency quite well. It’s popularity isn’t solely based on the flavor, however; turmeric’s health claims have elevated it to a drink you might be willing to pay half a day’s earnings on.

 

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Hash: A Simple Meal Based On Leftovers

Hash

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

No one loves to waste food. It’s not a guilty pleasure. It just happens when good people lose time to plan and execute.

 

I saw a billboard the other day that stated that the average American wastes 290 pounds of food per year. Given that each person eats about 4.5 pounds of food per day (according to the USDA), that 290 pounds would feed one person for OVER 2 MONTHS! Does that not stop you in your tracks? Does that not make you say “DAAAMN” (channeling Martin Lawrence, of course)?

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Mint, Ginger & Lime Green Tea

Mint

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fresh herbs are abundant this time of year (unless you’ve forgotten to water them. Rest in peace Chocolate Mint.). Luckily, you can usually find them at your local farmers markets or grocery stores. But whether you grow your own or purchase a bundle, it always seems like you have more left over than you actually use. Making a homemade syrup is a fast, easy and delicious way to use herbs that would go to waste otherwise.

 

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Lavender & Rosemary Shortbread Cookies

Shortbread

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cookies are my go to sweet indulgence – in large part thanks to my mom. My aunt is quoted as saying to her “you can whip up a batch of cookies from scratch in 10 minutes!”. I haven’t timed her but she probably can. You turn your back, and bam! there is a plate of cookies. There was never a shortage of cookies around our house, my favorite being her oatmeal cookies.

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Carrot & Kombu Quick Pickles

Carrots and Kombu

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hello!

 

Making quick pickles is one of the fastest and easiest ways to preserve the harvest. The recipe below only takes about a half hour to put together and can last a couple months in the refrigerator. It’s a great way to stretch produce if you don’t have a chance to cook it before it goes bad (or if you find a great sale at the farmers market).

 

*I originally posted some of the information below when I was blogging for Tant Hill Farm but I wanted to share it here as well. I have added some additional details that I think you will find useful. I tried to be as thorough as possible but post any questions in the comment section below and I’ll try my best to answer!

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Shiitakes Preserved in Oil

shiitakes preserved in oil

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This is my second attempt at preserving ingredients in oil and it is starting to become a favorite of mine. I made a batch of zucchini preserved in oil back in the summer and I am still enjoying them months later. Here is a summary of the basic steps (my zucchini posts provides more details): 1) use the freshest ingredients, 2) salt, dehydrate and/or pickle the ingredients, 3) cover in oil, and 4) store in the refrigerator. Not only do you get whatever it is that you preserved but you also get the flavor infused oil to make dressings or whatever else you can dream up.

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Fennel Infused Oil

fennel

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fennel isn’t something I use often but when I do, it is typically just the bulb. However, the stalks and fronds are a huge part of the plant and I hate to just throw them in the compost – there is a lot of flavor in there! Always looking for ways to use every last part of my produce, I decided to chop the stalks and fronds and cook them slowly in olive oil to extract their flavor. I added in orange zest, red pepper flakes and fennel seeds, which is a classic Italian flavor combination.

 

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